The Auburn City Schools Board of Education has released the names of the finalists for the superintendent position and will conduct interviews next Wednesday through Friday.

Applications from all over the Southeast were submitted after Superintendent Karen DeLano announced her retirement in April, and the search has been narrowed down to three candidates, according to an ACS press release.

The finalists are Cristen Herring, ACS assistant superintendent; Tim Smith, executive area director for the Orange County Public Schools in Orlando, Florida; and James Martin, school improvement specialist for the Chattahoochee-Flint Regional Education Service Association.

The three candidates will be interviewed by the board starting Wednesday at 10 a.m. The interviews will be open to the public. Herring will be interviewed Wednesday at 10 a.m., Smith on Thursday at 10 a.m. and Martin on Friday at 10 a.m. Interviews will take place at the Auburn Junior High School Performing Arts Center.

The earliest the board is expected to take action on appointing a new superintendent is at its June meeting. Board members Terry Jenkins and Kathy Powell serve on the Superintendent Search Committee.

About the candidates

Herring has been employed by ACS since 1993 and has served in a number of roles, including classroom teacher, System Reading specialist and principal of both Auburn Early Education Center and Ogletree Elementary before serving in her current position.

She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in elementary education, her administrative certification in education administration and her doctorate in educational foundations, tech and leadership — all from Auburn University. She also completed the Alabama Superintendent’s Academy in 2010.

Tim Smith is executive area director for the Orange County Public Schools, a district with 10 high schools. Smith has been employed by that system for 30 years. He has served as classroom teacher, dean, assistant principal and middle school principal before becoming executive area director.

He holds a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Delaware, a master’s in education leadership from Florida State University and earned an Education Leadership Certification and doctorate in educational leadership from the University of Central Florida.

James Martin has 10 years of experience as a school superintendent in Georgia. He has served in a variety of roles, including classroom teacher, band director, high school and middle school principal as well as superintendent of two school districts. In 2017, Martin received the Georgia School Superintendent Association Presidents Award. He also serves as an adjunct professor at Troy University, teaching curriculum and school law courses at the master’s and specialist levels. He completed the Alabama Superintendent’s Academy in 2004.

Martin holds a bachelor’s in music education from Auburn University, a master’s in educational administration from Troy University and a doctorate in educational leadership from Auburn University.

(2) comments

Rogerover

Good Candidates

Rogerover

But.....Why is the Auburn City School Board wasting everyone’s time and effort, expenses, and not to mention “doing it right” by insulting our intelligence? Everyone with .125 of a Brain knows with 9999999.9999% accuracy that the local candidate (and only Candidate from Alabama....I guess Alabama is weak in terms of quality superintendents...) is the next superintendent.
We should be embarrassed and ask this Board to do it right or Step Down.
By the way, I served on this Board in the past.....

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