Roy Moore

It has been a whirlwind of a run for U.S. Senate Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is facing accusations of alleged sexual assault from a handful of women dating back to when he was in his 30s and the women were minors — one as young as 14.

It has been a whirlwind of a run for U.S. Senate Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is facing accusations of alleged sexual assault from a handful of women dating back to when he was in his 30s and the women were minors — one as young as 14.

Moore, who has denied all accusations and fired back at national leaders who have suggested he step out of the race, recently issued an open letter saying he and his campaign are investigating the accusations.

"I ... did not date underage girls and have taken steps to begin civil action for defamation," he wrote in the letter, which was penned to Sean Hannity, a Fox News host, after Hannity said he would give Moore 24 hours to remove any doubt about the allegations that he pursued teenage girls as an adult.

The Villager requested to interview Moore for this article, both before and after the allegations of sexual assault broke, and after initial contact, his campaign stopped responding to requests. Because of this, The Villager has relied on Moore's formal statements and website for his positions on national issues and his responses to the sexual assault allegations.

Moore is a native Alabamian who served as a judge of the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Alabama before being elected as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in 2000. He was removed from this position in 2003 for refusing to uninstall a Ten Commandments monument he commissioned inside the Alabama Judicial Building and, after being re-elected in 2013, he was suspended in 2016 for going against the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling legalizing same-sex marriage by directing Alabama probate judges to continue to enforce the state's ban on same-sex marriage.

He said he was both "acknowledging the sovereignty of God" and "upholding the sanctity of marriage as between one man and one woman," respectively, according to his website.

Moore stands for lower taxes, smaller government, less spending and the return of manufacturing to America by "rescinding unfair free trade agreements," according to his website.

As far as immigration, he said the military must be used to protect the border, and if "a wall is our only option, then we should build it immediately."

In alignment with many Republican leaders in the Senate and House, Moore says the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, should be repealed. In regards to energy, he says coal mining and oil drilling should be encouraged and the U.S. should foster development of its own natural resources, like nuclear, solar, wind and fossil fuels.

He wishes to eliminate Common Core and leave educational systems under care of the state, not the federal government.

He's also professed some more controversial beliefs, like saying in a 2005 interview on TV that "homosexual conduct should be illegal," and on his website, he says "homosexuality should be against military policy."

Moore has retained the support of the majority of Alabama Republic leaders, including Gov. Kay Ivey, who said she plans to vote for Moore despite saying she believes Moore's accusers. A fundraiser was also recently held in Lee County, which Moore attended without speaking to media.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.